Iran: End Repression in Kurdish Areas

From Human Rights Watch…

(New York, January 9, 2009) – The government of Iran should amend or abolish broadly worded national security laws used to stifle peaceful dissent in the country’s Kurdish areas and end arbitrary arrests of Kurdish critics and dissidents, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today.iran_0109_web

The 42-page report, “Iran: Freedom of Expression and Association in the Kurdish Regions,” documents how Iranian authorities use security laws, press laws, and other legislation to arrest and prosecute Iranian Kurds solely for trying to exercise their right to freedom of expression and association. The use of these laws to suppress basic rights, while not new, has greatly intensified since President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad came to power in August 2005.

“Iranian authorities show little tolerance of political dissent anywhere in the country, but they are particularly hostile to dissent in minority areas where there has been any history of separatist activities,” said Joe Stork, deputy director of Human Rights Watch’s Middle East and North Africa Division.

Kurds account for 4.5 million of the 69 million people in Iran, and live mainly in the country’s northwest regions. Political movements there have frequently campaigned for greater regional autonomy. The main Iranian Kurdish parties with a long history of activism deny that they engage in armed activity and the government has not accused these groups of any such activity since the early 1990s.

“No one would contest a government’s right to suppress violence,” Stork said. “But this is not the case here. What is going on in the Kurdish areas of Iran is the routine suppression of legitimate peaceful opposition.”

The new report documents how the government has closed Persian- and Kurdish-language newspapers and journals, banned books, and punished publishers, journalists, and writers for opposing and criticizing government policies. Authorities also suppress legitimate activities of nongovernmental organizations by denying registration permits or charging individuals working with such organizations with spurious security offenses.

One victim of the government’s repression is Farazad Kamangar, a superintendent of high schools in the city of Kamayaran and an activist with the Organization for the Defense of Human Rights in Kurdistan. He has been in detention since his arrest in July 2006. The new report reproduces a letter Kamangar smuggled out of prison describing how officials subjected him to torture during interrogation.

On February 25, 2008, Branch 30 of Iran’s Revolutionary Court sentenced him to death on charges of “endangering national security.” Prosecutors charged that he was a member of the Turkey-based Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), but provided no evidence to support the allegation. In July, the Supreme Court upheld the sentence. Kamangar’s lawyer has appealed to the head of the judiciary to intervene, the only remaining option for challenging the sentence.

Download Report here (English version; .pdf 716kb)

Download Report here (Persian version; .pdf 636kb)

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